On Your Mark, Get Set …

Its February and we’ve just crossed the halfway mark through winter. Hurray! It has been a particularly brutal season and although it still feels like we’re in Antartica, spring will be here in some weeks. And when it does, we’re going to be ready. Right?

Okay, lets get organized. Gather your garden journal, laptop/tablet, paper and pen, garden photos from last year, seed and plant catalogs, the telephone and your drink of choice. Get cracking! Review, revise, make lists, draw plans, place orders, chart out schedules. Have a vision and act accordingly. Time spent planning and preparing is never a waste.

As I’d mentioned a couple of weeks ago, I’m planting a shadblow tree this spring. I will order it from my local nursery now so they can get it for me as early as possible. Likewise, all the plants I intend to get into the garden this year. I have the pressure of getting my garden ready for its Open Day (May 10)!Seeds will be started soon – vegetables and annuals. In addition to the usual seed flats started in the greenhouse, I’m going to try out the method suggested here: http://www.gardendesign.com/seed-sowing-snow
Go on, experiment along with me. Lets see what we learn.

Sorting through photos and notes, I’ll consider what worked and what did not. Successes and failures are great teachers. I’ll revise plans and see what improvements and additions are required. Each task will be prioritized and scheduled. This includes repairs and rearrangements. Tools will be sharpened, cleaned or replaced as necessary. Supplies such as stakes, ties, Epsom salts, dormant oil, fish and seaweed emulsion etc., will be restocked. The big calender will be filled with all the chores – daily, weekly, monthly etc., Vacation weeks will be factored in. As precise as all of this sounds, I always keep it flexible as weather and life have a way of messing up plans. After all, this exercise in preparation is meant to make gardening pleasurable. Lets keep it that way.

To help with tracking what needs to be done when, do refer to the Things To Do page on this website. Depending on your location and type of property and specific garden design, you can add or alter as per your needs. Whilst we go about gardening in relative solitude, there is a deep comfort in knowing one is part of a like-minded tribe of caretakers of this beautiful, generous Earth.

A friend sent me this link and I think it has great potential. Do check it out:
http://mobile.nytimes.com/2014/01/16/technology/personaltech/review-parrot-flower-power-plant-sensor.html
I’d love to get feedback from those who try this.

With so much to do, February will seem shorter than it is! Soon after that, the snowdrops will be awakening. Will you be ready?

Some good news: My photo of a milkweed seed pod opening to release seeds made it into the BBC ‘Your Pictures’! Check out link below. I’m very kicked! < http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/news/in-pictures-25942841 >

Garden journals and notebooks

Garden journals and notebooks

 

Ready to be transplanted!

Ready to be transplanted!

 

Root cuttings of hydrangea, myrtles and scented geraniums

Root cuttings of hydrangea, myrtles and scented geraniums

 

Making raised beds

Making raised beds

 

Popular gourd in India but exotic here!

Popular gourd in India but exotic here!

 

Patty-pans for the gourmet

Patty-pans for the gourmet

(c) 2014 Shobha Vanchiswar

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3 thoughts on “On Your Mark, Get Set …

  1. So ready for spring! But haven’t done a thing but complain about winter. Will use your site to organize. Does indeed feel good to be part of the tribe!

  2. Your number one fan from Blackburn Old Farm is beaming with pride from around and above us. What an inspiring piece! Wow. Bowled over. This could even inspire me to start gardening.

    By the way you have a 12 year old “number two fan” who has many seeds and is ready to plant inside very soon. She is planning a cut flower garden.

    Your number 1 fan (maybe number 2 soon!) from Cape Elizabeth Maine.

    P.S. Do I recognize the farmer building the raised beds? Did you start him as a seedling?

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