Budding Friends

Gardeners are a friendly bunch. But gardening itself is somewhat solitary. We look upon our plants as rather agreeable company. After all, plants make patient listeners and quiet supporters. Over time, trees and other long lasting plants become familiar friends we come to rely upon. I personally have been known to vent, confide and brainstorm with several of them as I’ve gone about weeding, pruning and planting. I’ve come to depend on their counsel and consolation. Any length of time in their presence does a world of good to my spirit and temperament.

I’ve worked out so many problems, sorted through various emotions and made sound decisions after opening up to my photosynthetic friends. Similarly, they have borne witness to the many celebrations and marked countless milestones. A gathering in my garden is an acknowledgement to the vital role its residents play in my life.

As with most gardeners, we share plants with each other. We trade, gift and covet each other’s plants freely. So when I wander through my own little Eden, those friends who gave me specific plants are also on my mind. These associations stay strong and alive forever. Some of those generous friends have passed on but their gifts remind and reassure. Their spirits are at home here. I cherish their company too.

Then there are the new friendships that come about in gardens. In my case, my garden’s open day is the ideal set up for making more friends. After all, those who come to see and appreciate the garden are typically kindred spirits. Especially the ones who brave inclement weather and/or drive fair distances to see the many gardens! I love my open days precisely because I get to meet some terrific new folk and reaffirm my fondness for those already known. I’ve learned all sorts of new stuff about plants, nifty gardening methods, new recipes, other fine gardens, obscure but terrific books and movies and, best of all, formed friendships that open more vistas in my life. My cup runneth over. I exist in a perpetual state of gratitude. Without all these friends, my life would be mind-numbingly dull.

At my most recent open day, I met a couple who, for some strange reason, felt as though I’d always known them. It felt comfortable. Well, listening to one’s instincts is good. A few days later, I was offered some lovely primula babies from their garden. Offer accepted!

This past Sunday, we had a most enjoyable visit and I came away with a rather embarrassingly generous haul of primulas from their totally charming garden. Pat and Jon, a million thanks.

You see how it works? I ended up with new plants, got to see a beautiful, new garden and gained two new friends. Budding friends indeed.

Note – All through the month of June, I will have my artwork on exhibit at the Ruth Keeler Memorial Library in North Salem. Do please go and take a look.

Now, enjoy the i-phone photos from Pat and Jon’s garden – I apologize to those reading on your phone or on Facebook as some of the images will appear upside down. On your laptops they will appear fine. Or, go directly to my website.

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The primulas!

The primulas!

Emma. Another new friend.

Emma. Another new friend.

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A charming collection of miniature hostas, geraniums and other gems.The hand is there for scale!

A charming collection of miniature hostas, geraniums and other gems.The hand is there for scale!

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(c) 2017 Shobha Vanchiswar

Good Views, Bad News

I think I’ll start with the bad news. You probably know it already. The tick population is at an unprecedented high this year. And that means higher incidences of Lymes disease. But that’s not all. A new tick related disease has entered our realm. A tick-borne disease called Powassan, or POW, has spread to New York. It is potentially deadly and much worse than Lymes. The CDC website gives all the cautionary details so please look it up. With informed vigilance and common sense we can continue to enjoy our time outdoors.

Clearly, that mild winter has done no good by us. Chipmunks, mosquitoes and ticks are having the time of their lives.

The other piece of cautionary news –  It appears that some “Big Box Stores” are selling Milkweed plants treated with systemic Neonicotinoids. This will kill caterpillars that feed on the plant. Milkweed is THE host plant for the Monarch. Please, be aware and be on the lookout for these tags placed in plants. It is outrageous that any pesticide has been applied on them. While the scientific /environmental / gardening community has been working hard to make the public aware of the urgent need to plant milkweed to support the Monarch butterfly, irresponsible suppliers to the Big Box stores have been poisoning the plants for their own financial gain.

In doing the right thing of planting native plants, please check if they have been tainted with any pesticides. Let your conscience guide you when it comes to where you shop for plants. I support local, family owned nurseries.

If you discover that your plants have been treated with chemicals, complain loudly. Protest. Boycott.

Our health and indeed the health of the planet is in the balance.

Now for the good views. Enjoy the Open Day photos of my garden and Rocky Hills. This is why we garden! Hallelujah.

Starting with my garden:

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Sneaking in my newest pillows. Tell me what you think! More of those and other products will be uploaded on 'Shop' soon. Stay tuned!

Sneaking in my newest pillows. Tell me what you think! More of those and other products will be uploaded on ‘Shop’ soon. Stay tuned!

Rocky Hills:

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(c) 2017 Shobha Vanchiswar

Rocky Hills Reboot!

Two years ago, when Henriette Suhr died, the fate of her beloved and spectacular gardens at Rocky Hills was uncertain. After all, who knew when the property would sell, who would buy it and would they be interested in maintaining the gardens. That the public would get to visit Rocky Hills again was understandably somewhat remote. But, one could hope for the best.

Well, the powers that be must’ve felt the powerful energy beseeching them to safeguard Rocky Hills. Exactly a year ago, Barbara and Rick Romeo became the new owners and a force 10 sigh of relief was felt amidst the members of the Rocky Hills devotees. The Romeos are the ideal couple to step into the ownership of RH.

They have lived in the area for a long time, are pillars of the community, gotten to know and appreciate RH, and were friends with Henriette. Barbara is a talented, knowledgeable and thoughtful gardener in her own right. RH couldn’t be in better hands.

There is no doubt that Henriette is truly resting in peace.

I am thrilled to say that this coming Saturday, May 20, from 10 am to 4 pm, Rocky Hills will be open to the public once more. I beg you to not miss this event!

Gardens are never meant to be static. They must evolve over time and rightfully get transformed as different gardeners and different times make their mark. It’ll be exciting to see how RH thrives with the Romeos. And thrive it surely will.

While my heart is indelibly marked with the most wonderful memories of RH, I’m so eager to see how it develops and changes. Henriette would be the first person to say that revisions and innovations are the hallmarks of any healthy garden.

Assuredly, the Romeos have the daunting responsibility of a legendary garden but they are more than up to the challenge. I, for one, wish them the very best. Their generosity in sharing this garden is a true gift to all of us.

May Rocky Hills live long and prosper.

Please enjoy these images of RH taken over the years:

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Henriette in my garden

Henriette in my garden

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(c) 2017 Shobha Vanchiswar

Flower Power, Giving Power

Our human response to flowers must be coded in our DNA. We incorporate flowers into every aspect of our lives. All occasions of any significance are marked with them. We say so much through flowers. Joy, sorrow, pride, victory, loss, love, remembrance – get expressed with flowers. And so, it stands to reason that gardens have in their power to bring positive change in more ways than the obvious.

This past Saturday saw just such an event. ‘Bloom’ was held to raise funds for the Pleasantville Community Garden which raises produce for area food pantries and shelters. Based on the edict ‘Bloom where you are planted’, local artists were asked to donate nature inspired works of art for a silent auction. Held at the Station restaurant in Chappaqua, NY, it brought folks together to socialize, sip and nosh, bid on the beautiful art works and give to the cause. A win-win all around.

When approached about donating a painting, my response was a no-brainer. A big, enthusiastic YES! All the participating artists responded alike. After all, art has a reach that transcends conflict, partisanship and every form of hate.

Coming up this Friday and Saturday May 12 & 13, we are offered yet another opportunity to help others while we help ourselves – to plants, art, local food products, nature inspired soft furnishings, stationary and other goodies. Check here for hours and all other details of the PlantFest at Teatown.

The Teatown Lake Preservation is a veritable treasure in our midst. Its Wildflower Island is a marvelous paradise of native plants. We are so fortunate to have it for our pleasure and leisure. If you haven’t already, please do visit and explore Teatown as often as possible. I promise you will love it.

I am very proud to be participating in the Teatown PlantFest. My art and products inspired by the flowers in my garden will be available. Not only will a portion of the sales help Teatown but, another part of it will support a cause dear to my heart – the children with HIV/AIDS at the orphanage of Mukta Jeevan in India.

It is my hope that you will support this event.

Also, on Saturday May13, from 10 am to 4 pm, my own garden will be doing its part in raising awareness and funds for the Garden Conservancy. Another organization that serves us all by preserving some of America’s finest gardens. So, please come to my Open Day. Your presence is much needed. Besides, the garden is looking quite lovely right now.

Pssst! Remember, I will have four types of ferns for sale! They are in the form of small plugs so planting them will be super easy.

PlantFest and Open Day will be held rain or shine. So, come! No excuses will be accepted!

It is only right that we all come together to uplift those in need and in doing so, we rise as a community, as a country, as humans.

Here’s a glimpse of my garden right now –

Lilacs and Broom. The fragrance is heavenly!

Lilacs and Broom. The fragrance is heavenly!

In the meadow, columbines sway.

In the meadow, columbines sway.

Meadow madness

Meadow madness

Foxgloves in force

Foxgloves in force

Tulips and candytuft at play

Tulips and candytuft at play

(c) 2017 Shobha Vanchiswar

 

 

The Chipmunk Challenge

April showers have indeed brought May flowers. Oh how I love this time of year! So much promise, so much growth, so much beauty, so many chipmunks. That last one has become the bane of my days. And nights.

It seemed like that the most prolific thing in the garden last year were the chipmunks. They were all over the place. Every gardener I spoke to confirmed my observation. I ought to have been worried right then. Then, the weirdly mild winter permitted these rodents to continue to thrive. They were happily active tunneling around and under the garden. For years there has been a resident population of chipmunks beneath the checkerboard garden but no real harm had been done apart from the compelling task of regrading the area routinely. A nuisance but still tolerable.

But now, they have expanded their subterranean kingdoms. They are under my perennial beds. I noticed their telltale holes and trails during the winter and heard alarm bells go off in my head. With nothing short of dynamite or equivalent poison to hit them with, I tried to stay calm and hoped for the best though, a part of me kept thinking about what they must be feasting on. I couldn’t bear to dwell on it and yet, I couldn’t stop.

Once it was apparent that spring was finally here, it became a matter of wait and see. Given the bipolar nature of this particular spring, it has been a challenge. Plants are emerging erratically – some too early, some too late and some on time. So I’ve waited. It was becoming clear – the darned critters have been gorging on many of my bulbs. I’m not as yet clear on which perennials have also been fodder. I have the other perennial bed to compare and contrast which is very useful. Meanwhile, the limbs of the New Dawn rose that covers the arch was greening up nicely till I realized a few days ago that no leaves were emerging from those limbs. The roses in other parts of the garden are leafed out but this one has not a single one. The roots of the rose are in the bed that the chipmunks have made their home. I’m still trying to come to terms with this state of my rose. Clearly, it will have to be replaced. But what good would that do if I don’t have a way to protect it from those miniature menaces?

Because chipmunks are classified as ‘wildlife’, normal pest control companies cannot address the problem. Besides, even they would have to resort to very toxic and generally harmful poisons or to trapping. The former will endanger all creatures and pollute the soil and water-table while the latter would be less than effective in deterring and ridding the garden of them. Stuff like the extremely malodorous urine of fox have not been seen as effective. So I’m at a loss for a solution to my dilemma.

A birth-control specificto chipmunks in the guise of tasty treats would be ideal. Better yet, a plant with such a property would be poetic justice. For now, I’m licking my horticultural wounds, mourning the loss of beloved plants and plotting my campaign.

This is war.

Stop press! At my Open Day ( May 13, 10 am -4 pm), I’ll be selling four types of ferns. I got them from none other than my dear friend Dr John Mickel – one of the world’s foremost fern scientists. They are in plug form so very easy to plant. Come and get ’em! All proceeds will go to the Garden Conservancy.

And don’t forget – the PlantFest at Teatown Lake Preservation. First pick on May 12 4-7pm and then to one and all on May 13, 9 am – 2 pm. Stop by my Seeds Of Design booth!

Chipmunk hole in perennial bed observed in February

Chipmunk hole in perennial bed observed in February

Telltale trails through the mulch

Telltale trails through the mulch

No leaves on the rose limbs.

No leaves on the rose limbs.

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Barely any tulips in this bed. Sad!

Barely any tulips in this bed. Sad!

Come, take a load off your feet!

Come, take a load off your feet!

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Apple blossom buds

Apple blossom buds

Pear blossoms

Pear blossom

The back from above in the house

The back from above in the house

In the meadow

In the meadow

The meadow right now

The meadow right now

In the herb garden

In the herb garden

With the Mickels and ferns

With the Mickels and ferns

(c) 2017 Shobha Vanchiswar