The Sun Shines Even When it Rains

Last week was wet, wet, wet. And cold. Work in the garden was a challenge if not impossible. Till the Friday before when it felt like a gift – dry, cloudy and mild. Taking full advantage of that one day, like marathoners we persevered and got stuff done. By days end, the garden looked ready and ravishing. Then Saturday, the big day for the garden arrived and it was wet, wet, wet. And cold.

Who in their right minds would want to venture out in such weather? Not many obviously. Just some die-hards and some friends who fear your wrath if they’re no-shows. Admittedly, it is disheartening to wake up to inclement weather on open day. After all the work getting the garden ready it feels like such a let down. This is the fourth year running when it has been rainy and chilly. Grrrr! We’ve become gluttons for punishment.

Instead of the usual waves of visitors, it was a trickle. The garden looked lovely and stepped up smartly to please and cheer all who came. I had the satisfaction of knowing all the major spring jobs were done and from now on, it would be all about maintenance – weeding ( garlic mustard is already rearing its ugly head in the meadow), judicial watering and vigilance for pests. That’s a really nice place to be for a gardener. It’s one of the major benefits of preparing for open day. So, on Saturday, despite the weather, I felt good knowing all that needed doing had been done. The rainy day was beyond my control.

Those who come to gardens undeterred by the weather, fall into a very special category – curious, friendly, knowledgeable and most generous of spirit. I had the best time reconnecting with returning visitors and forging new connections with first-timers. We exchanged thoughts and ideas that will no doubt make each of us better gardeners. I found out about a couple of new products that could potentially be godsends – stay tuned for future reports. Even better, I have been enriched with some new friendships. Gardens have a way of bringing kindred souls together.

Whilst I was lamenting on the rain and cold and how it kept people from getting out to visit gardens, I met some folk that just blew me away. Within the first hour of opening, a couple arrived and told me that they had driven down from Rochester, NY to see my garden ( and other open gardens no doubt). Wow, right?!

Then, later on, another couple showed up – they had flown in from St Louis, MO! Just to check out some of the gardens that were open this weekend. Can you believe it?

Both couples were so charming and convivial. I cannot properly express just how honored and humbled I am that my garden was on their must-see list. This alone makes all the work leading up to Open Day worthwhile. Lousy weather notwithstanding.

Through the rain shone bursts of human sunlight and even the cold could not stop my heart from being warmed. Thank you, thank you, thank you.

Note: The following photos were taken at Open Day by a lovely young ( all of 23 years ) lady. Lillian Roberts is smart, funny and gorgeous. And she clearly has great taste in gardens.

(c) 2018 Shobha Vanchiswar

Flowers, Showers, Zero Hour

What in blazes is going on with the weather? Just two weeks ago we had a rash of summer heat followed by near perfect spring days and now we’ve regressed to days poised to blow hot and cold. And from needing some respite from the dry conditions, it is now wet, wet, wet.

As Open Day draws near ( this Saturday!), I’m searching anxiously for some indication of what will be in bloom. Typically, the meadow should be sparkling with alliums, camassia and columbines in full bloom, the creeping phlox in the checkerboard garden ablaze with starry flowers while the wisteria over the pergola bears imminent promise of a purple explosion. The ‘heat wave’ helped jump start the plants after winter dragged on and on. But now, we’re back to being behind schedule. This is admittedly frustrating. A little warmth and sunshine is not too tall an order right?

The perennial beds in front are looking fetching with tulips and newly opened camassia but even there, the columbines, amsonias and baptisia are lagging behind. With the exception of a riotous carpet of violas, forget-me-nots and dandelions in the meadow, all of the gardens in the back of the property are replete with buds – so, are they going to pop open for Open Day visitors or not?

I guess we will just have to wait and see. Zero hour is 10:00 am Saturday May 19.

I look forward to your visit.

(c) 2018 Shobha Vanchiswar

 

Springing For A Cause

It’s an incredibly busy time right now. The garden of course is taking up most of my attention. Both PlantFest and Open Day are coming up this weekend and the following Saturday respectively. With so much else also making demands on my time, it’s easy to question why I’m taking on all the work. The answer is really quite simple – to make a difference.

I started the Printed Garden line of products because I wanted to step up my game in helping children with HIV/AIDS at the Mukta Jeevan orphanage. It has been ten years since I first met the children and began my work of fund-raising for their educational needs. As they got older, their needs became bigger. Having a consistent source of funds in addition to generous donors became imperative. Using my art for the cause seemed elementary. I have the products available on-line but pop-up shop opportunities give me the added chance to engage with the public, receive feedback, make new friends and gain more support. Work that can often feel lonely needs these human interactions to reassure and reaffirm my purpose.

TeaTown is in itself a most worthy cause. If you aren’t familiar with this local treasure and its mission, do look up their website. The PlantFest marks their spring fund raiser, with myriad plants for sale, it gets the community into a gardening state of mind and kicks off the season for TeaTown’s Wildflower Island. My participation in this event is win-win all around. Definitely worth my effort.

The Open Days Program of the Garden Conservancy is one of those great ideas that pleases and informs the population at large so much that it is easy to forget that it actually serves a bigger purpose. The Conservancy’s mission is to preserve landmark gardens across America. This takes a huge amount of effort, man power and funds. The Open Days program, raises awareness and monies to that end. However, it also provides gardeners and garden lovers an opportunity to visit private gardens, learn about new or unfamiliar plants, designs and horticultural practices. Once again, like PlantFest, it brings together people in a most beautiful way. I’ve been a garden host for this event for about ten years and I’m just as honored to do so now as when I was first approached by the Conservancy about putting my garden in their Open Day program. It’s all good.

In supporting the Garden Conservancy this way, I have met and befriended some amazing people, increased my horticultural knowledge and, acquired some pretty nice plants from those generous souls. If working like a possessed person preparing my garden for its Open Day gets me new friends and plants, well then, here I am – in the thick of manic gardening.

I’ve watched friendships between garden visitors blossom and it wouldn’t surprise me if garden visiting MeetUps become the coolest thing.

So come, join me at PlantFest and in my garden to celebrate the season, life and the sheer joy of being alive.

Note: at both events you can stock up on my products – they make beautiful and functional gifts for Mother’s Day, birthdays, bridal and wedding showers, housewarmings, host/hostess, teacher appreciation, yourself. 100% of the profits go to support the children at Mukta Jeevan orphanage.

Attention! Rocky Hills’ Open Day is on May 19 as well! A not to be missed garden!

(c) 2018 Shobha Vanchiswar

May Day! May Day! May Day!

I can’t believe it’s May! Looking around the garden, spring is surely here but the flowers are a few weeks behind schedule. The protracted winter kept us waiting and yearning for its end so now that the season of growth has begun, I’m not complaining. Just as long as we are given a proper length of spring. As of tomorrow, for the next three days, we are expecting the temperature to spike up to 80+ degrees. Please lets not have all the spring flowers rush to bloom all at once!

The sight of plants coming awake is so exciting. I absolutely adore this anticipation of the spectacular displays to come. With my garden Open Day a mere three weeks away and TeaTown’s PlantFest less than two weeks away, there is tons of work to do. At double time. I’m juggling other work and garden work in a frenzied sort of way. When I’m working on one thing, I’m feeling the pressure of the other pending projects. The up side is that this will not go on forever. PlantFest will happen.  Open Day will come and fingers crossed, the garden will please the visitors. I’m also doing my best to appeal to the weather gods to bless us with fabulous weather.

In the midst of addressing all the work and responsibilities, I have been completely consumed by the robin’s nest below the kitchen window. I’d become the creepy stranger lurking around spying on an expectant mother. I took pictures constantly and every task that took me away from said window was resented.

Yesterday morning, as I made coffee, I watched the mama robin sitting calmly and patiently on her clutch of four eggs. Took a picture. She turned her head, cocked an eye upwards, indicating she was aware of me.

A half-hour later in my office upstairs, I noticed a couple of large crows flying past the window in front of my desk. Something about them made me uneasy but I had to carry on with the task at hand. About an hour later, I went back down to the kitchen and peered out. It was completely empty. No mama, no eggs. I could see a piece of blue egg shell on the ground. An avian home invasion had occurred.

I’m totally heartbroken. I realize it’s nature at work but this travesty happened in my garden and somehow I cannot help feeling like I failed in protecting the robins. If only the wisteria had begun leafing out as it would’ve normally, the nest situated within its limbs would have been better hidden. Perhaps if I’d stayed at the kitchen window, I could’ve shooed away the crows. If only …

Life, I know must and will go on. But I’m taking some time to mourn this loss. To send thoughts and blessings to that mother – to stay strong and try again soon at a safer site. And for what it is worth, I’m so sorry.

Last Saturday, to help me stay on track with my work ( without being distracted by the goings on in nests and such), I had sent off for a good outdoor camera ASAP. No, pronto, toute suite. It was to be set up so it could take photos of the nest round the clock. I wouldn’t have to miss anything. Sadly, that will no longer be necessary for this occasion.

Instead, I’m going to position the camera to take a series of shots that determine a time-line of sorts of how the meadow evolves through the seasons. Perhaps it’ll be interesting. Or merely prosaic. For the time being, it’s all I can emotionally handle.

Building the nest

Still building

Both parents

Four perfect eggs

Incubating

After the home invasion.

(c) 2018 Shobha Vanchiswar