The Long View

I’m not letting the languorous days of summer lull me into complacency. The days might be too hot and muggy to do much physically in the garden but, there’s still plenty by way of planning, reviewing, ordering and scheduling that can be addressed. Now is when we look ahead to the fall and the next year.

With that in mind, I have been busy. Last week, I ordered my bulbs for fall planting. The largest order to date and I’m trying not to think about the amount of work it’ll take to plant all those hundreds and hundreds of bulbs.

Separately, there will be new perennials to plant and existing ones to divide and replant as well. This week, I’m working on the list of perennials I’m going to order through my local nursery. The rather ambitious list needs whittling to suit the wallet and the practical aspects in the garden. My modest sized garden can only hold so much.

In planning the “new and improved” beds, I’ve had to confront the fact that a couple of trees have grown so much that there is far more shade than there used to be. There is a clear need for more sun if the garden I’ve created is to thrive. So last week, I consulted with an arborist and the decision was made to elevate the lower canopy and reduce spread of the upper canopy to reduce shade to the garden areas. Prune dead and weak limbs back to sound tissue. Fingers crossed that this will open up the garden sufficiently.

This project must get done well before the fall planting is to begin.

A task I’ve become expert at avoiding is that of getting rid of plants that have either not performed as expected or were mistakes altogether. Ousting a plant makes me feel guilty. It seems cruel. However, I’ve given the matter a lot of thought recently and I’m now ready to send eviction notices. Okay, not quite so harshly.

How did I have a change of heart? It occurred to me that getting rid of otherwise perfectly good and healthy plants was no different from cleaning out and organizing my clothes closet. When certain garments, still in good condition, no longer fit or suit my taste, I’m quite happy to toss out them out. The discarded items get donated to charity or anyone who might covet them. The same approach should work with the plants – there are gardeners out there who need my rejects. I myself have gratefully been on the receiving end of other people’s discards. I cannot explain why it’s taken me so long to come to this realization.

While all this planning is underway, I’m considering reconfiguring a couple of beds. I’m not sure as yet of the aesthetics but I expect to make a decision in a few weeks. After all, this too will need to be done and ready in time for the bulbs and plants come fall.

You see? No mindless languishing on the hammock. No rest for the wicked …

Note: The vertical garden is looking rather fetching at present. Enjoy!

The sunflower that decided it wanted to be a wall flower!

Weary window-boxes

Coneflower color

(c) 2018 Shobha Vanchiswar

Pursuing Piet

Piet Oudolf. When you see that name, what comes to mind? Chances are you think of the High-Line, NYC or Lurie Gardens in Chicago. Am I right? Those gardens placed him right into the American consciousness but Piet is SO much more than that. I know because I discovered him about twenty years ago. That’s long before most of you had heard of him, yes?

I first came across the classic Oudolf mark of naturalistic plantings that were all about movement and atmosphere in a garden magazine from the UK. Something about that article got me in a way I couldn’t quite explain. All I recognized was my own discovery that this style spoke directly to my gardening soul. So I researched the man. It wasn’t easy – Google was not as yet so amazing ( it was in its infancy ). And Piet was mostly working in the Netherlands and in the UK. But, persistence ( okay, my obsession ) pays off and I got to learn more about the designer. Then, in 2008, on a trip to the Netherlands, I decided I simply had to meet Piet and see his own garden in Hummelo. And I did. A high point in my gardening life.

Piet and his wife Anja were warm and friendly. Their garden and nursery more than lived up to my expectations. Much of what we have come to see as typical Oudolf plant choices are not only American natives but they are also hardworking and quite affordable. Piet’s genius is in how he uses them – the combinations and placements play up the best features of the plants. At that time, I was myself beginning to move towards mostly native plantings so, seeing how absolutely gorgeous this garden looked cemented my decision to go native. I’m not a purist about it. Non-natives are welcome as long as they are not invasive and are present in much smaller numbers as compared to the indigenous ones. That precious and delicate balance of native flora and fauna is critical to the health of the environment.

At that meeting, Piet mentioned that he was just starting on a new new project in Manhattan. Who knew this would prove to be the High-Line!

Piet Oudolf’s reputation has deservedly grown exponentially and he is perhaps the most influential garden designer in 25 years. His projects in public spaces all over the United States and Europe are now landmarks. Even his drawings of garden designs are works of art – so much so that a couple of years ago, a Hauser and Wirth exhibit in England, showcased some of them. If you are not as yet familiar with this exceptional garden designer, please make it a point of visiting the gardens created by him. They are inspiring and instructive and look good through all the seasons. So, it’s informative to visit several times through the year.

Speaking of seasons, there is a documentary film on Piet Oudolf “Five Seasons – The Gardens Of Piet Oudolf”. I saw it this past Sunday and enjoyed it immensely. You will have to search out a theater that is showing it. I had to go to a screening two hours away! It was worth it. For this devout gardener, it was akin to a pilgrimage to get a glimpse of one of the gods of the gardening world. I am now recharged, resolved and ready to implement more Oudolf ideas into my garden.

Note: I’m sharing some photos of my 2008 visit to Hummelo:

With Anja

(c) 2018 Shobha Vanchiswar

Foresight

Right in the middle of a summer ripe with heat and humidity, the hour is on hand to scheme and dream for the next year. Fall being the ideal season to plant bulbs and most other plants, I’m spending time this week with catalogs, pages torn from magazines, scribbled pieces of papers, i-phone photos and notes.

July and August are what I call the doldrums of the gardener’s year. No heavy work is done at this time. It’s all about maintaining a steady state of weeding, watering and harvesting. This allows one to peruse the plant magazines and catalogs at leisure. Keeping sight of how the garden is doing at present helps in identifying successes and failures with an immediacy and accuracy that photographs alone may not convey later. While winter is another opportunity to design and plan, it behooves every gardener to take this lull in garden activity to honestly assess the garden, consider future actions, do the research and set in motion the next steps. From ordering bulbs and plants for fall planting to other projects such as installing watering systems, compost bins, laying paths, repairing or renewing walls, fences, decks or terraces, this is the time to make the arrangements. Make necessary appointments, schedule services, take bids and consults, order plants and materials – all of these can be done now so that once the seasons change, the work can commence in an orderly, efficient manner. No scrambling to find the time, hiring the right personnel, sourcing the required materials etc.,

Over the years, I have learned that planning now reduces not only the stress of last minute actions but it also serves to find the best people, products and plants at the best prices. Plus, I enjoy the process of perusing and preparing so much more whilst seated in the garden with my feet up, a choice, chilled drink in hand, listening to birdsong and time stretching ahead.

Note: The art show ‘Waterfronts’ is on till Sept 5. Do go! Don’t miss the exceptional views of the city from the windows at the gallery!

A wild orchid in the herb garden – I’m trying to identify it.

Dwarf hollyhocks. I think I prefer the towering ones.

The wall is looking so fine.

(c) 2018 Shobha Vanchiswar

 

Summer Stock

I think we can all agree that this year, things in the garden have been a tad more unpredictable. Given the winter, plants that I thought wouldn’t make it did while certain stalwarts didn’t. Bloom times were delayed in general and flowers designed to bloom in coordination with others did not. Spring flowering trees put on a show that made up handsomely for the slow moving season. All in all, the garden delivered.

My summer garden however, is dragging me down. The recent heat wave that lasted about 10 days of course roasted some plants ( at least that’s my excuse and I’m sticking to it ). The astilbes withered almost right away, the acanthus has stood up well, the sanguisorba started out with promise but then succumbed to the heat. The cimicifuga are holding up and should be at peak very soon. The Bonica roses are gasping their last breaths while the hollyhocks are looking ravishing. Echinacea and hydrangea are also making a splash. But on the whole, the garden is sporting a very shaggy look. Something needs to be done. I must give the matter serious consideration and make necessary changes and adjustments.

It’s going to take a degree of ruthlessness that I’ve been shying away from. Poor performers have to go. Editing and limiting will be my strategy. Stick to a few hardworking plants instead of wanting too many demanding divas. In some cases, I must swallow my pride and admit to mistakes ( it’s hard to concede when much time and money were invested) but I’m going to do it. It’s the only way I can reach my goal of a better summertime garden.

I’m also dealing with a horrid problem. The handkerchief size lawn I have is suddenly riddled with holes. We aren’t sure if this is a result of the chipmunks expanding their sub-subterranean real estate, skunks digging up Japanese beetle larvae ( I haven’t seen any beetles ) or moles. At first we noticed patches of browning grass and then the holes appeared. At present, the whole area looks disastrous.This is going to be a major project but I have declared war even though the enemy is yet to be identified. Stay tuned for future reports. If anyone has any advice or suggestions regarding this lawn situation, please share. This general is seeking counsel in the garden’s war room.

Here are some photos of what’s doing in the garden at present:

Hollyhock

Acanthus

The lawn problem

Mallow

Bagged fruit – protects from insects and other critters. Fingers crossed

Ornamental raspberry

Oak-leaf hydrangea

Young grapes

The wall

Baptisia seed pods

Amsonia seed pods

Sanguisorba alba

(c) Shobha Vanchiswar 2018

Second Sight

We are suffering through a horrid heat wave at present. It’s been five days of 90 + temperatures and given the dew point, it feels above 100. The weather authorities are trying to keep our spirits up by assuring us that by weeks’ end there’ll be a break. One can only hope.

It’s too hot to do anything outdoors. It’s too hot to even be in the garden. I’m spending my time mostly holed up in cool interiors catching up on reading and binge-watching TV shows. So I cannot really complain. At least I’m getting up to speed on The Bridge, Master Of None and How To Get Away With Murder. When I’m all caught up, I think I’ll check out the new attraction A Very English Scandal. Imagine how erudite and on trend I shall be at the myriad social events this season.

But, back to the garden where even the bees are not too busy. I do believe every living thing is struggling to conserve energy and keep cool. Apart from watering the plants in pots, no work has been attempted by me. Weeding just has to wait. I was hoping to cut the asters and other fall blooming plants this week to nudge them to get fuller and more floriferous but that task too must wait till the heat wave passes.

I’m gearing up to seriously rethink the plants in the meadow. First off, a major thinning out has to happen. Then, instead of trying to have too many types of native plants, I’m going to focus on maybe a dozen only. The ‘immigrant’ bulbs and primulas will remain to give that extra oomph in spring but each season will showcase perhaps just 2-4 types of natives. Columbines and geums to grace mid to late spring with their light splashes of color for example. As I work on this project, I’ll report back here.

There is need for editing and refocusing in many parts of the garden. It’s now reasonably mature and things are looking a bit unkempt – some effort to bring back my original vision is called for. Plants I want to emphasize are being overshadowed by the supporting cast, some candidates are not working out at all and, it’s time to introduce a few new plants to infuse a bit of horticultural energy in the mix.

When assessing ones garden in this way, a gardener can always use an objective eye to give counsel. This can be tricky. Advice can often be mistaken for criticism and we gardeners can be somewhat sensitive. But, I’ve got the perfect solution. Have a bunch of talented artists paint in the garden.

Artists naturally edit and compose as they work. They see subjects with the view to enhancing certain areas, blurring others and ultimately giving the essence of a place. Atmosphere, light, shapes and color are all elements that come through in good art and in good gardens.

This past Saturday, heat and humidity notwithstanding, a group of my studio-mates from the Art Students League of New York came to paint in my garden. They painted all day and how prolific they were! I’m never surprised by how amazing the paintings are but I am always inspired and impressed. A very talented, interesting and fun group that I’m privileged to call my friends.

Here’s the best part – the resulting paintings give me insight to my garden. The artists’ editing, focusing, different perspectives are all giving me fresh ways to review and plan on what I myself want to address in the garden. So sneaky right?!

Note 1: Don’t forget! Art show reception this Thursday, July 5 –

Note 2: Go to Shop for great gifts! 100 % of the profits supports orphan children with HIV/AIDS

And now, enjoy the photos of the artists and their work –

(c) 2018 Shobha Vanchiswar